Approved For Delivery Close All

  • Level 6
    • Digital & Technology Solutions Professional (Degree)

      A Digital & Technology Solutions Professional provides technology enabled solutions to internal and/or external customers, in a range of areas including software, business and systems analysis, cyber security, data analysis and network infrastructure. They implement technology solutions that enable businesses to develop new products and services and to increase an organisations productivity using digital technologies. They are confident, competent and capable independent Technology Solutions Professionals able to operate in a range of related roles. The occupation is based upon a core set of outcomes that will be supplemented by one, and only one, of six specialism areas detailed below that cover the roles identified by employers.

       

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Digital

      Notes:

      Funding band 15

      Links: 

    • Registered Nurse (Degree)

      A career in nursing is dynamic and exciting with opportunities to work in a range of different roles as a Registered Nurse. Your nursing career will mean working with a variety of service users, families and carers, and with a range of health and care professionals and other agencies. You might be working in: a hospital, someone’s home, the community, social care or public health. Registered nurses are a key part of the multidisciplinary teams that meet the health and care needs of patients and service users. You will be at the centre of teams that can include other health and social care professionals. The current Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) standards comprise a common core of skills and knowledge for all nursing students, with specialisms in adult nursing, children’s nursing, mental health and learning disabilities. The apprentice must meet the 15 standards required by the Care Quality Commission [as set out in the Care Certificate].

      Industry Sector: Health and Science

      Notes:

      Funding Band 15

      Options: adult, mental health, children and learning disability nurse.

      Reference: ST0293

      Links: 

    • Senior Compliance/Risk Officer Specialist

      Within the Risk/Compliance function of a specific organisation, the role of the Senior Compliance/Risk Specialist is to provide high quality input and advice to the business in their specialist area(s) of expertise e.g. risk, financial crime, compliance, modelling/analysing data. This is likely to include dealing with complex problems, implementing new legal/regulatory requirements, working with senior managers in the organisation. The role requires sound ethical standards, significant technical expertise, together with the capability to influence senior members of the organisation as there can often be differing views on the appropriate action to take. Deep underpinning knowledge of risk and compliance frameworks, policies and procedures will be required. It may cover compliance or risk functions or be a blend of both depending on the organisation.

       

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Legal, Finance and Accounting

      Notes:

      Funding Band 15

      Reference: ST0363

      Links: 

    • Healthcare Science Practitioner (Degree)

      Healthcare Science (HCS) Practitioners (HCSPs) fulfil a common occupational role1. They work independently and as part of a team providing HCS scientific and technical services within HCS Divisions in Life Science, Physiological Science, or Physical Science, with the specific focus of work determined by the area/department within which they work.2 They use expertise in applied scientific techniques to deliver patient sensitive and quality assured tests, investigations and procedures (in some cases, including specialist therapeutic interventions) on samples, patients and equipment. HCSPs are responsible for the analysis of a wide range of diagnostic tests that contribute to the clinical assessment of patients for the presence of disease, the monitoring of health and the effectiveness of treatments. While working to departmental protocols, HCSPs are required to use judgement, deal with ambiguity and supervise the training of those in the trainee practitioner and HCS support workforce. HCSPs work in a range of different settings including hospitals, primary care, public health, and private sector hospitals.

       

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Health and Science

      Notes:

      Funding Band 15

      Reference: ST0413

      Links:

  • Level 5
    • Laboratory Scientist

      A fully competent Laboratory Scientist will be able to work in a wide range of organisations, including but not exclusively, chemical, pharmaceutical, biotechnology, formulated products, nuclear and analytical services. A scientist can carry out a range of technical and scientific activities which may include laboratory based investigations and scientific experimentation in their specialist field. They will analyse, interpret and evaluate relevant scientific information, concepts and ideas and use these to develop subsequent experiments or investigations and to propose solutions to problems. They will be able to apply knowledge of underlying scientific principles to implement new processes according to the literature or input from senior team members. They will be able to work autonomously and part of a wider scientific team, taking responsibility for the quality of the work that is undertaken, to deliver scientific value to their organisation. They will be proactive in finding solutions to problems, be able to identify areas of business improvement and propose innovative scientific ideas. In all contexts working safely and ethically is paramount and many companies operate under highly regulated conditions because of the need to control the quality and safety, for example medicines.

       

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Health and Science

      Notes:

      Funding Band 15

      Reference: ST0247

      Links:

    • Dental Technician

      Dental Technicians design, manufacture, modify and repair custom-made dental appliances. Typically the work is undertaken in a dental laboratory on a prescription from a dentist. The work can broadly be split into crown & bridge, dentures and orthodontics; most labs specialise in one or two of these areas but during the apprenticeship Dental Technicians will develop competency across all disciplines from start to finish before choosing if/where to specialise once they are qualified. Dental Technicians tread a fine line between art and science; they manufacture precise custom-made medical appliances but require the attention to detail, colour and manual dexterity that is expected of fine artists. Dental Technicians are registered professionals and work within the standards and scope of practice defined by the General Dental Council (GDC) Scope of practice document September 2013. Working as part of the Dental Team Dental Technicians will need to comply with professional regulation, collaborate with dental practices and occasionally meet patients. Dental Technicians will be able to work with minimum supervision and are responsible for the quality of their finished work before it is released to the dentist and patient.

       

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Health and Science

      Notes:

      Funding Band 12

      Links:

    • Assistant Practitioner (Health)

      Assistant Practitioners work as part of the wider health and social care team and have direct contact with patients, service users or clients providing high quality and compassionate care. Assistant Practitioners work at a level above that of Healthcare Support Workers and have a more in-depth understanding about factors that influence health and ill-health (e.g. anatomy and physiology). Assistant Practitioner is a job title applied to a very wide variety of roles that have been developed locally by employers to meet individual service need. Upon successful completion of this standard, individuals will have obtained the core skills, knowledge and values/behaviours to become an Assistant Practitioner.

      Industry Sector: Health and Science

      Notes:

      Funding Band 10

      Reference: ST0215

      Links:

       

  • Level 4
    • Commercial Procurement and Supply

      The work of procurement and supply professionals include the process of procurement, or buying goods and services; however, these roles can be much broader than just procurement. These roles can extend to a huge range of related commercial activity such as influencing policy, financial analysis, engaging in contract law, and developing strategy to deliver services. The variety of goods and services that procurement professionals are responsible for is vast: goods could range from buying a plane to negotiating new stationary supply. Securing services could include: finding new and innovative IT systems, outsourcing translation services or closing a deal on a construction project for a new building.

       

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Sales, Marketing and Procurement

      Notes:

      Funding band 9

      Reference: ST0313

      Links: 

    • Cyber Intrusion Analyst

      The primary role of a Cyber Intrusion Analyst is to detect breaches in network security for escalation to incident response or other determined function. An Intrusion Analyst will typically use a range of automated tools to monitor networks in real time, will understand and interpret the alerts that are automatically generated by those tools, including integrating and correlating information from a variety of sources and in different forms and where necessary seek additional information to inform the Analyst’s judgement on whether or not the alert represents a security breach. When an Analyst has decided that a security breach has been detected, he or she will escalate to an incident response team, or other determined action, providing both notification of the breach and evidence with reasoning that supports the judgement that a breach has occurred. An Analyst will typically work as part of a team (or may lead a team) and will interact with external stakeholders, including customers and third party sources of threat and vulnerability intelligence and advice.

       

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Digital

      Notes:

      Funding Band 12

      Reference: ST0114

      Links: 

    • Network Engineer

      The primary role of a network engineer is to design, install, maintain and support communication networks within an organisation or between organisations. Network engineers need to maintain high levels of operation of communication networks in order to provide maximum performance and availability for their users, such as staff, clients, customers and suppliers. They will understand network configuration, cloud, network administration and monitoring tools, and be able to give technical advice and guidance.

       

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Digital

      Notes:

      Funding Band 12

      Reference: ST0127

      Links:

    • Data Analyst

      The primary role of a Data Analyst is to collect, organise and study data to provide business insight. Data analysts are typically involved with managing, cleansing, abstracting and aggregating data, and conducting a range of analytical studies on that data. They work across a variety of projects, providing technical data solutions to a range of stakeholders/customers issues. They document and report the results of data analysis activities making recommendations to improve business performance. They have a good understanding of data structures, database systems and procedures and the range of analytical tools used to undertake a range of different types of analyses.

       

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Digital

      Notes:

      Funding Band 11

      Reference: ST0118

      Links: 

    • Dental Practice Manager

      The Practice Manager is responsible for managing all non-clinical aspects within a specified practice/s to achieve excellent patient care, quality, cost and delivery performance in line with practice strategy, goals and values. The Practice Manager leads the team by providing support and direction to enhance performance, skills and knowledge of all practice staff.

       

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Health and Science

      Notes:

      Funding Band 9

      Reference: ST0109

      Links: 

    • Healthcare Science Associate

      The Healthcare Science (HCS) Associate workforce supports the work of HCS Practitioners and Clinical Scientists in performing high quality, safe diagnostic, therapeutic and monitoring technical and scientific procedures from conception to end of life in job roles within hospitals, general practice and other settings in the healthcare sector and across all areas of HCS. They perform a wide range of routine technical and scientific procedures, with minimal supervision, within one of the Divisions in HCS, following specific protocols and in accordance with health, safety, governance and ethical requirements. The clinical scientific environment determines the context of the HCS Associate work/role.

       

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Health and Science

      Notes:

      Funding Band 9

      Reference: ST0220

      Links:

    • Associate Ambulance Practitioner

      The Associate Ambulance Practitioner (AAP) works as part of the wider Emergency & Urgent Care setting, having direct contact with service users or others, providing high quality and compassionate care. Day to day duties and tasks for an AAP would involve working as part of an ambulance crew responding to emergency (999) and urgent calls providing emergency and urgent assistance, driving safely and progressively at high speed. The AAP will assess, treat and manage service users at the scene (reducing the need for hospital admission), either referring service users to alternative care provisions or safely discharging them on scene. Other tasks involve working closely with other emergency services and the wider NHS. Tasks of an AAP will include evaluating different approaches to solving problems, communicating those results accurately and reliably, with structured and coherent arguments. AAP’s work at a level above that of Healthcare Support Workers and have knowledge of the underlying concepts and associated principles within their area of study, including the ability to evaluate and interpret these. They will have the qualities and transferable skills necessary for employment, exercising some personal responsibility. AAP’s will undertake further annual training and develop new skills within a structured and managed environment when employment is secured. The AAP will work under the supervision of a Registered Practitioner in accordance with Regulatory policies and procedures for an initial probationary period of 20 weeks. After successful completion the AAP will be accountable for their own actions, operating within their own scope of practice, and will work alongside professional colleagues of higher or lower grades.

       

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Health and Science

      Notes:

      Funding Band 11

      Reference: ST0287

      Links: 

    • Associate Project Manager

      Projects can be defined and delivered within different contexts, across diverse industry sectors. They can be large or small. Every project needs to be managed to ensure its success, An associate project manager knows what needs to be achieved, how it will be achieved, how long it will take and how much it will cost, and works with the project team to achieve the required outcomes. Associate project managers need good planning, organisation, leadership, management and communication skills. An associate project manager utilises resources with suitable skills, qualifications, experience and knowledge to work together in a motivated and integrated team, with clearly defined reporting lines, roles, responsibilities and authorities. Dependent upon the size of the organisations and the complexity of projects, associate project managers’ job titles will vary, but typically they can include: assistant project manager, junior project manager, project team leader. Some organisations use ‘project manager’ as a generic job title.

       

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Business and administration

      Notes:

      Funding Band 9

      Reference: ST0310

      Links:

  • Level 3
    • Workplace Pensions Consultant or Administrator

      Workplace Pensions Administrators play a critical role in managing the day to day operation of workplace pension schemes. A Workplace Pensions Administrator is likely to be involved in a variety of tasks supporting more senior administrators. This may include, but not be limited to: Producing quotations and setting up benefits for members including retirement, death and leaving service before retirement, transfers into or out of the workplace pension scheme; Maintaining workplace pension scheme cash books; reconciling bank statements; preparing cash-flow forecasts;  Collating information and drafting Administration Reports for clients;  Maintaining and updating member records for example revised salary data, changes of address or marital status. Responding to workplace pension scheme specific enquiries from members, including fund valuation requests, information on investment options; clarification of the benefits payable under the workplace pension scheme.

       

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Legal, Finance and Accounting

      Notes:

      Funding Band 9

      Reference: STO187

      Links: 

    • Team Leader/ Supervisor

      A team leader/supervisor is a first line management role, with operational/project responsibilities or responsibility for managing a team to deliver a clearly defined outcome. They provide direction, instructions and guidance to ensure the achievement of set goals. Working in the private, public or third sector and in all sizes of organisation, specific responsibilities will vary, but the knowledge, skills and behaviours needed will be the same whatever the role. Key responsibilities are likely to include supporting, managing and developing team members, managing projects, planning and monitoring workloads and resources, delivering operational plans, resolving problems, and building relationships internally and externally.

       

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Business and administration

      Notes:

      Funding Band 7

      Reference: ST0384

      Links: 

    • Senior Healthcare Support Worker

      Senior Healthcare Support Workers help registered practitioners deliver healthcare services to people. As an experienced support worker, you carry out a range of clinical and non-clinical healthcare or therapeutic tasks, under the direct or indirect supervision of the registered healthcare practitioner. You provide high quality, compassionate healthcare, following standards, policies or protocols and always acting within the limits of your competence. You may work in a range of services eg hospital, community, health or day case unit, birth centre or midwifery led unit, someone’s home, operating theatre, nursing or care home, assessment centre, hospice, school, prison, GP surgery, charity or voluntary organisation; working in partnership with individuals, families, carers and other service providers. Options: 1. adult nursing support, 2. maternity support, 3. theatre support, 4. mental health support, 5. children and young people support, 6. allied health profession – therapy support.

       

       

      Industry Sector: Health and Science

      Notes:

      Funding band 4

      Reference: ST0217

      Options: adult nursing support, mental health support, maternity support, theatre support, children and young people support and allied health profession therapy support.  Additional potential option for ambulance support is in development.

      Links: 

    • Hospitality Supervisor

      Hospitality Supervisors work across a wide variety of businesses including bars, restaurants, cafés, conference centres, banqueting venues, hotels or contract caterers. They provide vital support to management teams and are capable of independently supervising hospitality services and running shifts. They typically work under pressure delivering fantastic customer service and motivating a team is essential to their role. The majority of supervisors’ skills and knowledge are the same but supervisors may specialise in specific functions or work across a variety of functions which reflect the multi-functional nature of the industry.

       

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Catering and Hospitality

      Notes:

      Funding Band 7

      Reference: ST0230

      Options: food and beverage service, housekeeping, concierge, front office, events and outlet supervisors.

      Links: 

    • Laboratory Technician

      Laboratory technicians work in a wide range of organisations, including but not exclusively, chemical, primary and secondary pharmaceutical, biotechnology, formulated products, nuclear companies; and analytical science services. A laboratory technician may carry out both routine and one-off laboratory testing and perform a variety of technical support functions across the organisation. In any context working safely and ethically is paramount and many companies operate under highly regulated conditions because of the need to control the quality and safety of products, for example medicines. Laboratory technicians are expected to work both individually and as part of a laboratory team. They are able to work with minimum supervision, taking responsibility for the quality and accuracy of the work that is undertaken. They are proactive in finding solutions to problems and identifying areas for improving the business.

       

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Health and Science

      Notes:

      Funding Band 13

      Reference: ST0248

      Links: 

    • Lead Adult Care Worker

      As a Lead Adult Care Worker you will make a positive difference to someone’s life when they are faced with physical, practical, social, emotional or intellectual challenges. You will be expected to exercise judgement and take appropriate action to support individuals to maintain their independence, dignity and control. By providing leadership, guidance and direction at the frontline of care delivery you will be instrumental in improving the health and wellbeing of those receiving care and support. Lead Adult Care Workers will in some circumstances have delegated responsibility for the standard of care provided and may supervise the work of other care workers. This exercising of autonomy and accountability means leading and supporting others to comply with expected standards and behaviours. Lead Adult Care Workers may work in residential or nursing homes, domiciliary care, day centres or some clinical healthcare settings. As well as covering Lead Adult Care Workers this standard also covers Lead Personal Assistants who can work at this senior level but they may only work directly for one individual who needs support and/or care services, usually within their own home.

       

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Social Care

      Notes:

      Funding Band 4

      Reference: ST0006

      Links:

    • Dental Laboratory Assistant

      To complement the role of Dental Technicians who design, manufacture, modify and repair custom-made dental devices. It is recognised that many dental laboratories have opportunities for individuals who will assist, under supervision, in the manufacture of dental devices. This pathway is designed to be the initial stage leading to the role of assistant and giving the opportunity for entry to higher qualifications that develop individuals for professional registration with the General Dental Council (GDC). During the apprenticeship, Dental Laboratory Assistants will develop basic competency in core laboratory skills before focusing on specific areas of employment. This includes primary stages in the manufacture of a range of dental devices and may extend to one part of the manufacturing process in a dental laboratory, which may include crowns, bridges, dentures or orthodontics appliances. Working as part of the Dental Team, Dental Laboratory Assistants will need to have knowledge of industrial regulations, health and safety compliance and meet communication standards. Dental Laboratory Assistants will always work under direct supervision of a registered and qualified Dental Technician who will be responsible for their work.

       

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Health and Science

      Notes:

      Funding Band 7

      Links: 

    • Dental Nurse

      The Dental Nurse role complements the role of other dental professionals. One of the primary roles is to provide chair side support to dental professionals and deliver a high level of patient care. Dental Nurses may work in a variety of clinical environments and the Apprenticeship reflects all aspects of clinical responsibilities and duties of a dental nurse’s role and will provide the apprentice with the relevant qualification to apply to the General Dental Council (GDC) for professional registration as a dental nurse. Dental Nurses are registered professional and work within the standards and scope of practice defined by the GDC Scope of Practice document (Sept 2013).

       

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Health and Science

      Notes:

      Funding Band 9

      Reference: ST0113

      Links: 

    • Digital Marketer

      The primary role of a digital marketer is to define, design, build and implement digital campaigns across a variety of online and social media platforms to drive customer acquisition, customer engagement and customer retention. A digital marketer will typically be working as part of a team, in which they will have responsibility for some of the straightforward elements of the overall marketing plan or campaign. The marketer will work to marketing briefs and instructions. They will normally report to a digital marketing manager, a marketing manager or an IT Manager.

       

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Digital

      Notes:

      Funding band 10

      Reference: ST0118/03

      Links: 

    • Facilities Management Supervisor

      This apprenticeship prepares an individual for managing a facilities management service, or a group of services, which can be labelled as ‘hard’ (estate/building management) or soft (catering/cleaning/administration/security). All apprentices will be required to supervise others; to understand the contractual requirements and service delivery targets between their employing organisation and the client/customer in order to achieve service targets. The apprentice will have to provide customer service skills and be proactive in finding solutions to problems.

       

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Construction

      Notes:

      Funding Band 2

      Reference: ST0170

      Links:

    • Compliance / Risk Officer

      All financial services organisations have to meet a wide range of compliance and risk requirements set out in legislation e.g. data security or required by regulators e.g. financial crime, operational risk. To meet these requirements many organisations will have dedicated Risk and/or Compliance departments that are experts in the relevant legislation/regulatory requirements. They provide proactive support and guidance to the business areas to ensure that the organisation meets this wide range of requirements, balanced against achieving appropriate customer outcomes. In some organisations, this expertise may be embedded in the business areas themselves.

       

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Legal, Finance and Accounting

      Notes:

      Funding Band 9

      Reference: ST0362/02

      Links: 

  • Level 2
    • Passenger Transport Driver – Bus, Coach and Rail

      Every day millions of people travel on trains, buses and coaches to get to work, to see friends and family or to go on holiday. Passenger transport service professionals make a difference by ensuring they are able to travel safely, on time and in comfort from the beginning to the end of their chosen journey. An apprenticeship in passenger transport services is a great opportunity to acquire the skills, knowledge and behaviours that play a vital role in providing a high quality, accessible and safe passenger transport service to all customers. Depending on the type of transport system your employer is responsible for, you could be driving buses, trains or coaches. Your duties will include the effective and efficient operation of a passenger transport vehicle, driving legally and safely with a high attention to detail and prioritising on the safety of the passengers and the wider public. An apprenticeship in passenger transport services is your first stop to a great career in the transport industry.

       

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Transport and Logistics

      Notes:

      Funding band 8

      Reference: ST0338/01

      Links: 

    • Healthcare Support Worker

      Healthcare support workers (HCSWs) work as part of a team providing high quality and compassionate care to individuals. You will carry out well-defined routine clinical duties like monitoring an individual’s conditions (by checking things like blood pressure, temperature or weight), checking on their overall progress, comfort and wellbeing. Depending on where you work, you may also help them to eat, drink, wash, dress or go to the toilet. You will prepare individuals for healthcare activities carried out by other members of the healthcare team, looking after them before, during and/or after those activities in line with their care plan. You will also carry out non-clinical duties and, depending on where you work, this could include things like keeping records, making beds, tidying up your work area, returning or cleaning the equipment used during a clinical activity. You will be able to address straightforward problems in your day to day work, reporting concerns and changes to the appropriate person in a timely manner. HCSWs work in a range of healthcare settings and your team may include workers from both health and social care. You will report to a registered healthcare practitioner who will directly or indirectly supervise your work.

      Industry Sector: Health and Science

      Notes:

      Funding Band 4

      Reference: ST0216

      Links: 

    • Horticulture and Landscape Operative

      Horticulture and Landscape Operatives can be employed to work in public parks and gardens, green spaces and historic gardens, private gardens and estates or in production nurseries and retail outlets. Many businesses will be specialised in their activities, such as grounds maintenance (soft-landscape) or landscape construction (hard-landscape). Soft landscaping includes the establishment and maintenance of plants and cultivated areas. Hard-landscaping includes establishment of hard surfaces and structures in addition to the establishment of plants in cultivated areas. The distinct nature of these two specialisms means very few businesses can offer the full breadth of skills and therefore two options are available for this occupation; horticulture and landscape construction.

       

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Agriculture, Environmental and Animal Care

      Notes:

      Funding band 7

      Reference: ST0225/01

      Links: 

    • Hospitality Team Member

      A hospitality team member can work in a range of establishments, for example bars, restaurants, cafés, conference centres, banqueting venues, hotels or contract caterers. The role is very varied and although hospitality team members tend to specialise in an area, they have to be adaptable and ready to support team members across the business, for example during busy periods. The most important part of the role is developing fantastic ‘hospitality’ skills and knowledge such as recognising customer needs, knowing how to match them to the products and services of the business and working as part of a team to ensure that every customer, whether they are eating in a restaurant, drinking cocktails in a bar, ordering room service in a hotel or attending a business conference feels welcomed and looked after.

       

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Catering and Hospitality

      Notes:

      Funding Band 7

      Reference: ST0233/02

      Options: food and beverage service, barista, food preparation, housekeeping, concierge and guest services, reception, reservations, conference and banqueting.

      Links:

    • Healthcare Science Assistant

      The Healthcare Science Assistant (HCSA) support workforce contributes to safe patient care across all care pathways from conception to end of life in job roles within hospitals, general practice and other settings in the healthcare sector and across all areas of healthcare science. HCSAs perform a range of low risk, routine technical and scientific procedures usually within one broad area of HCS, following specific protocols and in accordance with health, safety, governance and ethical requirements. HCSAs work using standard operating procedures, initially under direct supervision but increasingly with experience, under indirect supervision.

       

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Health and Science

      Notes:

      Funding Band 7

      Reference: ST0218/01

      Links: 

       

    • Adult Care Worker

      To work in care is to make a positive difference to someone’s life when they are faced with physical, practical, social, emotional or intellectual challenges. Adult Care Workers need to have the right values and behaviours developing competences and skills to provide high quality compassionate care and support. They are the frontline staff who help adults with care and support needs to achieve their personal goals and live as independently and safely as possible, enabling them to have control and choice in their lives which is at the heart of person centred care. Job roles are varied and determined by and relevant to the type of the service being provided and the person supported. Adult Care Workers may work in residential or nursing homes, domiciliary care, day centres, a person’s own home or some clinical healthcare settings. This standard covers both Adult Care Workers and Personal Assistants. Personal assistants do the same job as an Adult Care Worker and work directly for one individual usually within their own home. Working with people, feeling passionate about supporting and enabling them to live a more independent and fulfilling life is a rewarding and worthwhile job that provides excellent career opportunities.

       

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Social Care

      Notes:

      Funding Band 4

      Reference: ST0005

      Links: 

    • Customer Service Practitioner

      The role of a customer service practitioner is to deliver high quality products and services to the customers of their organisation. Your core responsibility will be to provide a high quality service to customers which will be delivered from the workplace, digitally, or through going out into the customer’s own locality. These may be one-off or routine contacts and include dealing with orders, payments, offering advice, guidance and support, meet-and-greet, sales, fixing problems, after care, service recovery or gaining insight through measuring customer satisfaction. You may be the first point of contact and work in any sector or organisation type. Your actions will influence the customer experience and their satisfaction with your organisation. You will demonstrate excellent customer service skills and behaviours as well as product and/or service knowledge when delivering to your customers. You provide service in line with the organisation’s customer service standards and strategy and within appropriate regulatory requirements. Your customer interactions may cover a wide range of situations and can include; face-to-face, telephone, post, email, text and social media.

       

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Sales, Marketing and Procurement

      Notes:

      Funding Band 6

      Reference: ST0072

      Links: 

Approved For Development

  • Level 6
    • Cyber Security Technical Professional (Degree)

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Digital

      Notes:

      No documents available yet.

    • Digital Marketer (Degree)

      The Digital Marketer will lead on the creation and execution of a digital marketing strategy. They recognise and respond to business opportunities and customer requirements through a range of digital channels (such as Social Media, Websites, email). They actively employ content marketing and campaign management principles, and financial and analytical tools, to deliver successful initiatives that meet the needs and aspirations of their organisation.

       

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Digital

      Notes:

      Standard approved, assessment plan in development.

      Reference: ST0481/01

    • Project / Programme / Portfolio Manager (Degree)

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Business and administration

      Notes:

      Standard submitted.

      Reference: ST0411

       

    • Senior/Head of Facilities Management (Degree)

      Occupation /profile: FM practitioners work in the private, public or third sector and all sizes of organisation. Specific job roles at this level may include: Senior Facilities Manager; Head of Facilities; Head of Estates; Head of FM Operations. This role is accountable for the delivery of a variety of integrated FM operational services (e.g. cleaning, catering) across multiple sites or a portfolio of property assets and FM services, nationally or regionally. They are accountable for setting the FM strategy and budgets, overseeing the financial and operational performance of the FM function, managing client relationships, building the FM client base, business growth and developing the organizational capability of the FM workforce. They may be employed in-house by an FM company or this function might be outsourced and they may provide FM services in any industry sector.

       

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Construction

      Notes:

      Standard approved.

      Reference: ST0410

    • Social worker

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Social Care

      Notes:

      No documents available yet.

      Reference: ST0510

    • Paramedic (Degree)

      Occupational Profile: A career in paramedicine is a dynamic and exciting career with opportunities to work in a range of different roles as a Registered Paramedic. You will be a first-contact Allied Health Professional who works within the wider Urgent & Emergency Care setting. You will provide high quality and compassionate care, responding to the needs of service users and carers across the lifespan. You will work in a wide variety of settings, which may include a front-line ambulance, a GP surgery, a minor injury/illness centre, in remote medicine or a varied range of other environments. Responsibilities and duty of the role: At the point of registration, a paramedic is an autonomous practitioner who has the knowledge, skills and clinical expertise to assess, treat, diagnose, supply and administer medicines, manage, discharge and refer patients in a range of urgent, emergency, critical or out of hospital settings. You will be responsible and accountable for your decisions, and for reflecting upon the effectiveness of your actions with the aim of continually improving service user care. You will demonstrate leadership qualities and you will manage and lead colleagues. You will be responsible for ensuring your own knowledge and skills are current, and support the development of learners and new entrants to the profession.

      Industry Sector: Health and Science

      Notes:

      Standard approved.

      Links:

       

  • Level 5
    • Improvement Expert

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Business and Administrative

      Notes:

      Standard submitted – no further documents available.

       

    • Learning and Development Consultant/Business Partner

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Business and Administrative

      Notes:

      Standard submitted – no further documents available.

      Reference: ST0563

    • Leader in Adult Care

      The Leader in Adult Care will guide and inspire teams to make positive differences to someone’s life when they are faced with physical, practical, social, emotional or intellectual challenges. They will be a leader of the care team and will develop and implement a values-based culture at a service or unit level. They may be responsible for business development, financial control, organisational resilience and continuity as well as for managing risk and leading on organisational change. Leaders in Adult Care may work in residential or nursing homes, domiciliary care, day centres, a person’s own home or some clinical healthcare settings. The role of Leader in Adult Care in this standard also covers Personal Assistants in a management role over teams of other PAs but they may only work directly for one individual who needs support and/or care services. There are two main areas within this occupation involving either operating as an advanced practitioner with high level practice skills and knowledge or a manager with responsibility for managing community or residential based services. Both roles have a large element of leadership, whether with other care workers and networks or in leading the service itself. A successful leader will have met the core requirements common to both areas and also one set of option requirements. Managers have a responsibility to ensure the service is safe, effective, caring, responsive to people’s needs and well-led. They may be a registered manager of a service, unit, deputy or assistant manager. They will be responsible for ensuring compliance of the care given and the values and training of staff with established standards and regulations. Advanced Practitioners may have developed a high level of specialism in particular areas such as dementia, end of life, learning disabilities or mental health care.

       

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Social Care

      Notes:

      Standard approved, assessment plan in development.

      Links: 

    • Dental Hygiene Therapist

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Health and Science

      Notes:

      No documents available yet.

      Reference: ST0111

    • Further Education Learning and Skills Teacher

      The Learning and Skills Teacher (LST) is ‘dual-professional’, having first achieved competence in a vocational or subject specialism and then subsequently trained as a teacher. This means that many teachers in the Education and Training Sector (ETS) begin teaching as a second, or even later, career. The LST role is pivotal to the success of traineeship and apprenticeship programmes, in delivering effective vocational education and training that meets both learners’ and employers’ needs. LSTs teach young people and adults within all parts of the ETS, including: work based/independent training provision; further, adult and higher education; offender-learning; and the voluntary sector. LSTs are responsible for planning and delivering learning that is current, relevant, challenging, and that inspires learners to engage
      and achieve their full potential. LSTs collaborate closely with colleagues and other ETS professionals in supporting learner progress. LSTs ensure the physical, psychological and social wellbeing of learners.

       

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Childcare and Education

      Notes:

      Standard approved, assessment plan in development.

      Links: 

  • Level 4
    • Regulatory Compliance Officer

      Within the public sector, Compliance Officers either work to perform regulatory services functions within local authorities such as environmental health, fire safety or trading standards but may also work within monitoring compliance teams within national regulators such as the Food Standards Agency (FSA), Health and Safety Executive (HSE), Department for the Environment Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) or the Register of Regulated Qualifications (Ofqual). In the private sector, officers will typically be involved in supporting compliance activities within a range of businesses and liaising with frontline regulators. Additionally, officers will provide monitoring and oversight of the compliance related activities of the wider supply chain to assure product and process quality and safety as well as legality.

       

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Legal, Finance and Accounting

      Notes:

      Standard approved, assessment plan in development.

      Reference: ST0430/01

      Links: 

    • Higher/Further Education Assessor-Coach

      The AC role has emerged within the Education and Training Sector (ETS), over the last 30 years, originally as a result of the implementation of vocational (competence-based) qualifications (notably NVQs) and formalised work-based education and training. The AC is a dual professional, using their up-to-date professional knowledge and skills to support learner’s development across the ETS, including work based/ independent training provision; further, adult and higher education; offender learning and the voluntary sector. ACs coach and assess vocational learners, usually on a one-to-one basis, in a range of learning environments. Coaching skills involve complex communication techniques to actively listen, provide feedback and to engage learners in planning their individualised learning programme. These skills are also integral to assessing learners’ competence in relation to work-related/industry standards and life skills. ACs work cooperatively with other ETS professionals (such as teachers and mentors/supervisors in the workplace) in supporting the learner’s development of vocational competence and the wider skills that relate to employability and professionalism.

       

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Childcare and Education

      Notes:

      Standard approved, assessment plan in development.

      Reference: ST0146/01

      Links:

    • Hospitality Manager

      Hospitality managers work across a huge variety of organisations including bars, restaurants, cafés, conference centres, banqueting venues, hotels and contract caterers. These managers generally specialise in a particular area, however their core knowledge, skills and behaviours are aligned. Common to all managers in this role is their passion for exceeding customers’ expectations. Hospitality managers have a high level of responsibility and are accountable for fulfilling the business vision and objectives which requires excellent business, people and customer relation skills. Individuals in this role are highly motivated team leaders that combine a talent for management and specific industry skills and thrive on the customer facing nature of the role.

       

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Catering and Hospitality

      Notes:

      Standard approved, assessment plan in development.

      Options: management of food and beverage service, housekeeping, front office, revenue, conference and events, hospitality outlet, kitchen and multi-functional.

      Links: 

       

    • Lead Practitioner in Adult Care

      The Lead Practitioner in Adult Care will guide and inspire team members to make positive differences to someone’s life when they are faced with physical, practical, social, emotional or intellectual challenges. They will have achieved a level of self-development to be recognised as a lead practitioner within the care team, contributing to, promoting and sustaining a values-based culture at an operational level. They will have specialist skills and knowledge in their area of responsibilities which will allow them to lead in areas such as care needs assessment, occupational therapy, physiotherapy, rehabilitation and enablement, telecare and assistive technology. They will be a coach and mentor of others and will have a role in assessing performance and quality of care delivery. Lead Practitioners in Adult Care may work in residential or nursing homes, domiciliary care, day centres, a person’s own home or some clinical healthcare settings. As well as covering Lead Practitioners in Adult Care this standard also covers Lead Personal Assistants who can work at this senior level but they may only work directly for one individual who needs support and/or care services, usually within their own home.

       

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Social Care

      Notes:

      Standard approved, assessment plan in development.

      Links: 

    • Facilities Manager

      Facilities Managers work in the private, public or third sector and all sizes of organisation. Specific job roles at this level may include: Facilities Manager; Facilities Management (FM) Operations Manager; Estates Manager; FM Contract Manager. A Facilities Manager is responsible for the safe, secure and comfortable day-to-day working environment for properties, assets (e.g. equipment) and services that must be fully compliant with health and safety and other legislation. They are accountable for the management of the delivery of all FM services within their local area of responsibility e.g. for one or more contracts/services; specific services e.g. cleaning, maintenance or fleet services. They will ensure that levels of performance delivered exceed customer expectations within budget for the properties, assets and services. They may be employed in-house by an FM company or this function might be outsourced and they may provide FM services in any industry sector.

       

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Construction

      Notes:

      Standard approved.

      Reference: ST0484

      Links: 

  • Level 3
    • Learning and Development Practitioner

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Business and Administrative

      Notes:

      Standard submitted – no further documents available.

      Reference: ST0562

    • Bid and Proposal Co-ordinator

      The role of bid and proposal professionals is integral to how businesses win work. Sometimes it is a separate job/discrete role, and sometimes it is rolled into another function. As a key part of the sales and business development function, the role works across various business teams to bring together compelling, customer focused proposals and tender submissions to win business. The apprentice will develop commercial capability, vital to businesses and valued across all business sectors. The role of the Bid and Proposal Co-ordinator is to support new business through the full end to end proposal process – from initial interest and co-ordinating activities around pursuit of an opportunity, co-ordination of responses to pre-qualification questionnaires (PQQ), if applicable, and final tender proposal documentation submission. The role involves providing support to all affiliated functions to assist the quality and timely completion of proposal submissions – including organising meetings, structuring and writing proposal content, co-ordinating relevant activities and document management. This role extends to a range of related commercial activity such as sector analysis, trend analysis, engaging in contract law, and developing strategies to win business for a variety of goods and services. On completion of the Apprenticeship, many transferable skills will have been acquired, lending themselves to a variety of careers and job pathways. Staying in bid/proposal co-ordination and management is the most obvious route but roles in procurement, sales, business development, project management and many more, are options available dependent on the individual and their preferences and appetites.

       

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Health and Science

      Notes:

      Standard published, assessment plan in development.

      Reference: ST0056/01

      Links: 

    • Security First Line Manager

      The security sector covers a wide range of functions, ranging from the employment of security personnel to those involved in the design and implementation of complex security activities and/or equipment. Completion of the apprenticeship would enable candidates to develop the skills and knowledge required to manage people working specifically in a security environment such as Private Security Industry, MOD, Event Security, ‘In –house’ security, Department for Transport and will provide a vocational route to a career in Security Management (excluding close protection). Security First Line Managers will be competent in supervising people and activities in line with regulatory requirements; undertaking security risk assessments; providing security advice to others; understanding threat, vulnerability and risk; security methods, operations and activities; incident management and planning; stakeholder management; business communications and data security management within role(s) such as Ministry of Defence, Transport & Border Security and Private Security Industry. Understanding the threat, vulnerability & risk on a local, national and international security basis, and how to respond accordingly, would offer candidates a significant advantage over others with general managerial skills.

       

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Protective Services

      Notes:

      Standard approved, assessment plan in development.

      Links: 

    • Service and Maintenance Engineer

      Building Services Engineering makes buildings work. Service and Maintenance Engineers play a key role in planning and completing a range of maintenance work encompassing industrial and commercial building services engineering systems such as ventilating, heating, water supply, waste (effluent discharge) and drainage. This includes related electrical isolation, disconnection, reconnection and reactivation. They also complete planned preventative maintenance and undertake any required remedial repairs. In addition, they monitor and manage the operation of plant and equipment through building and energy management systems. They ensure these systems continue to operate to their design specification. They undertake work with a high level of autonomy and require highly developed diagnostic skills, detailed knowledge of system operating principles and the ability to take responsibility for fault finding, fault diagnosis, repair and maintenance of systems, components and equipment found in industrial and commercial buildings like office blocks, shopping centres, hotels, factories, schools and hospitals. Dealing with clients is an important aspect of Service and Maintenance Engineers work, to ensure maintenance activities are undertaken with minimum down time and impact on the buildings use. They are able to demonstrate competence in the health and safety, communication, quality control and environmental requirements appropriate to their scope of work. Service and Maintenance Engineers are able to work within occupied and unoccupied buildings and facilities on their own, proficiently and without supervision, in the most appropriate, efficient and economical manner. They must adhere to safe working practices without endangering themselves or others.

       

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Construction

      Notes:

      Standard approved, assessment plan in development.

      Links: 

    • Payroll Administrator

      Individuals in the role of a Payroll Administrator will have responsibility for setting up and operating the payroll within the organisation in which they are employed or on behalf of another organisation. Additionally and depending on their role within a given organisation, a Payroll Administrator may also have responsibility for accurate and the compilation of routine and non-routine payroll related calculations and other information to specific deadlines. This includes technical knowledge of the core elements of payroll, application of professional standards and effective communication with clients and customers of the payroll function. The role will be performed in order to meet relevant ethical, regulatory compliance and legal standards, having due regard for the policies and processes of the organisation, as well as legislative payroll practices. This role may be in a payroll bureau, bookkeeping or accounting practice, a professional services company or a separate function or part of another within a business or other organisation.

       

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Legal, Finance and Accounting

      Notes:

      Standard approved, assessment plan in development.

      Reference: STO073/01

      Links: 

    • Pharmacy Technician

      Industry Sector: Health and Science

      Notes:

      On hold awaiting outcome of General Pharmaceutical Council review of standards.

       

    • Horticulture and Landscape Supervisor

      Horticulture and Landscape Supervisors can be employed to oversee work in public parks and gardens, green spaces and historic gardens, private gardens and estates or in production nurseries and retail outlets. Many businesses will be specialised in their activities, such as grounds maintenance (soft-landscape) or landscape construction (hard-landscape). Soft-landscaping includes the establishment and maintenance of plants and cultivated areas. Hard-landscaping includes establishment of hard surfaces and structures in addition to the establishment of plants in cultivated areas. The distinct nature of these two specialisms means very few businesses can offer the full breadth of skills and therefore two options are available for this occupation; horticulture and landscape construction. The employment area will dictate the option pursued. The horticulture option focuses on plant propagation and plant growth. The landscape construction option focuses on the installation of features and structures; application of landscape materials as well as site management. A Horticulture / Landscape Supervisor can manage a site with minimum supervision, supervise a team and maintain the health and safety and security of personnel and resources. Working and learning in the horticulture and landscape industries is rewarding, offers a diverse range of employment opportunities and includes a range of skills that are transferable into other industries following further studies.

       

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Agriculture, Environmental and Animal Care

      Notes:

      Standard approved, assessment plan in development.

      Reference: ST0226/01

      Links: 

    • Further Education Learning Mentor

      Mentoring is – and has been for centuries – the foundation of vocational training and apprenticeships, yet this standard is the first formal recognition of this role. Nowadays, mentoring takes place in all parts of the Education and Training Sector including work based/independent training provision; further, adult and higher education; offender learning and the voluntary sector. All education and training roles are ‘dual-professional’, requiring (first) knowledge and skills in a specialist vocational or subject area as well as in helping learners to learn. The LM is (and has to be) ‘grounded’ in up-to-date processes and procedures, relevant to the learners’ programme of development. The role could, therefore, be considered to be a first step towards a secondary role as an education and training professional. LMs therefore support the development of learners’ knowledge, skills and behaviours, throughout their programme, particularly in applying theoretical learning in practical work environments (and usually on a one-to-one, or small group, basis). They give practical, technical and/or pastoral support and guidance.

       

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Childcare and Education

      Notes:

      Standard approved, assessment plan in development.

      Reference: ST0148/01

      Links:

    • Emergency Service Contact Handler

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Protective Services

      Notes:

      Standard submitted.

      Reference: ST0483

    • Engineering Craftsperson

      Building Services Engineering makes buildings work. It is a specialist branch of engineering within the construction sector. Craftspersons undertake the installation, testing, pre-commissioning, commissioning and decommissioning of large-scale engineering systems which are used for heating workplaces such as those found in industrial and commercial buildings like office blocks, factories, schools and hospitals. These engineering systems operate by moving temperature controlled water around the inside of buildings, providing heating and cooling, and utilise fossil fuels and sustainable energy systems.

       

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Construction

      Notes:

      Standard approved, assessment plan in development.

      Reference: ST0062/02

      Links: 

    • Business Administrator

      Business administrators have a highly transferable set of knowledge, skills and behaviours that can be applied in all sectors. This includes small and large businesses alike; from the public sector, private sector and charitable sector. The role may involve working independently or as part of a team and will involve developing, implementing, maintaining and improving administrative services. Business administrators develop key skills and behaviours to support their own progression towards management responsibilities. The responsibilities of the role are to support and engage with different parts of the organisation and interact with internal or external customers. With a focus on adding value, the role of business administrator contributes to the efficiency of an organisation, through support of functional areas, working across teams and resolving issues as requested. The flexibility and responsiveness required allows the apprentice to develop a wide range of skills. The business administrator is expected to deliver their responsibilities efficiently and with integrity – showing a positive attitude. The role involves demonstrating strong communication skills (both written and verbal) and adopting a proactive approach to developing skills. The business administrator is also expected to show initiative, managing priorities and own time, problem-solving skills, decision-making and the potential for people management responsibilities through mentoring or coaching others.

       

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Business and administration

      Notes:

      Standard approved, assessment plan in development.

      Reference: ST0070/01

      Links: 

    • Customer Service Specialist

      The main purpose of a customer service specialist is to be a ‘professional’ for direct customer support within all sectors and organisation types. You are an advocate of Customer Service who acts as a referral point for dealing with more complex or technical customer requests, complaints, and queries. You are often an escalation point for complicated or ongoing customer problems. As an expert in your organisation’s products and/or services, you share knowledge with your wider team and colleagues. You gather and analyse data and customer information that influences change and improvements in service. Utilising both organisational and generic IT systems to carry out your role with an awareness of other digital technologies. This could be in many types of environment including contact centres, retail, webchat, service industry or any customer service point.

       

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Sales, Marketing and Procurement

      Notes:

      Standard approved, assessment plan submitted.

      Reference: ST0071/01

      Links: 

  • Level 2
    • Recruitment Resourcer

      A recruitment resourcer may be employed in any organisation that requires a recruitment function. Their role is to identify, attract and shortlist candidates for the recruitment process to fulfil the requirements of the business brief and provide resourcing support to the recruitment function. They may also be required to identify new business opportunities. Typical responsibilities for a recruitment resourcer are: 1. Research, identify, attract and shortlist candidates for the recruitment process to fulfil the requirements of the business brief 2. Identify new business opportunities through a variety of means and refer these opportunities to a recruiter 3. Meet all procedures and carry out relevant processes to ensure industry codes of ethics and relevant legislation are adhered to.

       

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Business and administration

      Notes:

      Standard approved.

      Reference: ST0321

      Links: 

    • Optical Assistant

      An Optical Assistant requires many skills to be able to work within the Optical retail Industry. They are often the people that spend the most time interacting with customers. Therefore strong communication, listening skills and a passion for working with others to deliver excellent service and products that are both clinically and cosmetically correct, are skills, knowledge and behaviours that need to be demonstrated at all times. They may be working within a small practice, a large multiple practice or within the domiciliary environment. Optical Assistants have to interpret and understand a clinically issued prescription, its effects on the eye, and the customer’s vision. They need to be able to identify the appropriate spectacles to meet the customer’s needs and be able to explain the features and benefits of these, using non-technical customer friendly language. Optical Assistants require a broad range of technical knowledge about spectacle frame materials and fitting requirements including facial measurements, to ensure the maximum comfort of the spectacle frame for the customer, avoiding physical damage to the skin through ill-fitting or wrong material choice. They also require technical knowledge of optical lenses and the associated measurements of these lenses to allow correct and safe customer vision. They use an extensive range of technical equipment and tools to take measurements and adjust and repair spectacles.

       

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Health and Science

      Notes:

      Assessment plan submitted.

      Reference: ST0530/01

      Links: 

       

    • Cleaning and Support Services Operative

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Catering and Hospitality

      Notes:

      No documents available yet.

       

  • Level TBA
    • Public Policy Officer

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Digital

      Notes:

      No documents available yet.

    • Sonographer

      Industry Sector: N/A

      Notes:

      EoI approved – no further documents available.

       

    • Voluntary and Community Sector Worker

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Business and administration

      Notes:

      No documents available yet.

      Reference: ST0501

    • Rehabilitation Practitioner

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Social Care

      Notes:

      No documents available yet.

      Reference: ST0494

    • Rehabilitation Worker (Visual Impairment)

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Health and Science

      Notes:

      Standard submitted.

      Reference: ST0431

    • Senior Leader

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Business and administration

      Notes:

      No documents available yet.

      Reference: ST0480

    • IT Solution Technician

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Digital

      Notes:

      No documents available yet.

      Reference: ST0505

    • IT Support

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Digital

      Notes:

      No documents available yet.

      Reference: ST0126

Being Explored

  • Level 7
    • Senior Mentor/Coach Practitioner

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Health and Science

      Level: 7

      Notes:

      EOI submitted June 2017 – no further documents available.

       

    • Clinical Research Professional (Masters)

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Health and Science

      Level: 7

      Notes:

      EOI submitted – no further documents available.

  • Level 5
    • Hearing Aid Dispenser

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Health and Science

      Level: 5

      Notes:

      EOI submitted June 2017 – no further documents available.

  • Level 4
    • Marketing Executive

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Sales, Marketing and Procurement

      Level: 4

      Notes:

      EOI submitted June 2017 – no further documents available.

  • Level 3
    • Library, Information and Archive Services Assistant

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Business and administration

      Level: 3

      Notes:

      EOI submitted June 2017 – no further documents available.

    • Ambulance Healthcare Support Worker

      Industry Sector: Health and Science

      Level: 3

      Notes:

      IfA recommended that this occupation should fit with Senior HCSW as an additional option.  This is now being explored.

  • Level 2
    • Accounts Assistant

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Legal, Finance and Accounting

      Level: 2

      Notes:

      EOI submitted June 2017 – no further documents available.

  • Level TBA
    • Workplace Coach and Mentor

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: N/A

      Level: TBA

      Notes:

      EOI submitted – no further documents available.

    • Radiotherapy Assistant Practitioner

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Health and Science

      Level: TBA

      Notes:

      EOI submitted – no further documents available.

    • Senior Leader/Manager within Local Government/Public Sector

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Business and administration

      Level: TBA

      Notes:

      EOI submitted – no further documents available.

    • Senior Rehabilitation Practitioner

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Health and Science

      Level: TBA

      Notes:

      EOI submitted – no further documents available.

    • Management Coach and Mentor

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: N/A

      Level: TBA

      Notes:

      EOI submitted – no further documents available.

    • Medical Engineer

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: N/A

      Level: TBA

      Notes:

      EOI submitted – no further documents available.

    • Medical Ultrasound

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Health and Science

      Level: TBA

      Notes:

      EOI submitted – no further documents available.

    • Healthcare Specialist Engineer

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Health and Science

      Level: TBA

      Notes:

      EOI submitted – no further documents available.

    • Digital Marketing and Social Media Officer

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Digital

      Level: TBA

      Notes:

      EOI submitted – no further documents available.

    • Executive Coach and Mentor

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: N/A

      Level: TBA

      Notes:

      EOI submitted – no further documents available.

    • Health and Wellbeing Mentor

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: N/A

      Level: TBA

      Notes:

      EOI submitted – no further documents available.

    • Blue Light Worker

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Health and Science

      Level: TBA

      Notes:

      EOI in development.

    • Clinical Pharmacy Technician

      Please be advised: Skills for Health is not directly involved with this Trailblazer, therefore, the information is accurate and up to date to the best of our knowledge.

      Industry Sector: Health and Science

      Level: TBA

      Notes:

      EOI submitted – no further documents available.

Closed